Howard University soccer team pictured in 1930, the first year of varsity competition in the sport at the historically black college in Washington D.C. In issue one of XI, Tom Dunmore tells the groundbreaking and remarkable story of Howard’s soccer team, who in the 1970s became the first NCAA champions from a predominantly black college.Photo courtesy of the National Museum of American History’s Addison N. Scurlock collection.

Howard University soccer team pictured in 1930, the first year of varsity competition in the sport at the historically black college in Washington D.C.

In issue one of XI, Tom Dunmore tells the groundbreaking and remarkable story of Howard’s soccer team, who in the 1970s became the first NCAA champions from a predominantly black college.

Photo courtesy of the National Museum of American History’s Addison N. Scurlock collection.

#Howard University #NCAA #Washington DC #Soccer #Football #College Soccer #Sports #large

On June 20th 1977, the New York Times reported that the largest crowd to ever attend a soccer game in the United States had the previous day watched the New York Cosmos’ 3-1 victory over the Tampa Bay Rowdies at Giants Stadium, aided by a Pelé hat-trick. In a follow-up report a few weeks later in the Times, Tony Kornheiser (yes, that Tony Kornheiser) wrote that the Cosmos’ GM Mike Martin “was shivering with excitement” when the crowd was announced, and that LA Aztec’s owner John Chaffetz had “tears brought to my eyes” when he saw the above photo in the Times the next day.
The hyperbole did not stop there. The US Soccer Federation’s General Secretary Kurt Lamm told Kornheiser that “When they write the history of soccer in this country, that afternoon will be Day One in all the books.”
NASL Commissioner Phil Woosnam gustily predicted that “In as few as five years, but in no more than 10, soccer will become the biggest pro sport in this country, bigger than football.”
Kornheiser, after also reviewing the remarkably rapid growth of youth soccer in the U.S. throughout the 1970s, concluded himself that “Soccer is…in the infant stage of a boom that may leave it unmatched among team sports in this country. It is no longer an “immigrant” sport but suddenly something as American as, say, baseball.”
Yet, there was one downbeat section to Kornheiser’s report: soccer was not, he noted, proving popular in the inner-cities, while it was generally most popular in cities not noted for their ethnic minorities. “The inner-city youth looks to high-paying professional sports such as basketball and football for upward mobility out of the ghetto,” Kornheiser observed, also saying awareness of the sport remained low in cities due to the lack of television coverage. In places where soccer was traditionally popular with ethnic groups, like Toronto and Chicago, NASL’s attendances couldn’t even reach four figures except for Pelé’s visits. Crowds across pro soccer were extraordinarily varied (in the NASL, from 34,150 in 1977 for the Cosmos down to 3,902 for the Connecticut Bicentennials).
While looking past the euphoria of 62,394 witnessing the Cosmos was hard to do, the future was perhaps not quite as shiny as it appeared in the magical summer of 1977 for North American soccer. “The coronation of professional soccer is premature,” Kornheiser wisely concluded.
- Tom DunmoreFollow @pitchinvasion

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On June 20th 1977, the New York Times reported that the largest crowd to ever attend a soccer game in the United States had the previous day watched the New York Cosmos’ 3-1 victory over the Tampa Bay Rowdies at Giants Stadium, aided by a Pelé hat-trick. In a follow-up report a few weeks later in the Times, Tony Kornheiser (yes, that Tony Kornheiser) wrote that the Cosmos’ GM Mike Martin “was shivering with excitement” when the crowd was announced, and that LA Aztec’s owner John Chaffetz had “tears brought to my eyes” when he saw the above photo in the Times the next day.

The hyperbole did not stop there. The US Soccer Federation’s General Secretary Kurt Lamm told Kornheiser that “When they write the history of soccer in this country, that afternoon will be Day One in all the books.”

NASL Commissioner Phil Woosnam gustily predicted that “In as few as five years, but in no more than 10, soccer will become the biggest pro sport in this country, bigger than football.”

Kornheiser, after also reviewing the remarkably rapid growth of youth soccer in the U.S. throughout the 1970s, concluded himself that “Soccer is…in the infant stage of a boom that may leave it unmatched among team sports in this country. It is no longer an “immigrant” sport but suddenly something as American as, say, baseball.”

Yet, there was one downbeat section to Kornheiser’s report: soccer was not, he noted, proving popular in the inner-cities, while it was generally most popular in cities not noted for their ethnic minorities. “The inner-city youth looks to high-paying professional sports such as basketball and football for upward mobility out of the ghetto,” Kornheiser observed, also saying awareness of the sport remained low in cities due to the lack of television coverage. In places where soccer was traditionally popular with ethnic groups, like Toronto and Chicago, NASL’s attendances couldn’t even reach four figures except for Pelé’s visits. Crowds across pro soccer were extraordinarily varied (in the NASL, from 34,150 in 1977 for the Cosmos down to 3,902 for the Connecticut Bicentennials).

While looking past the euphoria of 62,394 witnessing the Cosmos was hard to do, the future was perhaps not quite as shiny as it appeared in the magical summer of 1977 for North American soccer. “The coronation of professional soccer is premature,” Kornheiser wisely concluded.

- Tom Dunmore

#New York #Giants Stadium #New York Cosmos #Soccer #Football #New York Times #Tony Kornheiser #Sports #Large

Several USWNT players amongst SI’s “40 greatest women athletes of Title XI era”, including Mia Hamm at #2.
siphotos:

This week, Sports Illustrated pays tribute to Title IX and its impact on women’s sports over the past 40 years. 
GALLERY: The 40 greatest women athletes of Title IX eraKILLION: Title IX has changed the world we live in

Several USWNT players amongst SI’s “40 greatest women athletes of Title XI era”, including Mia Hamm at #2.

siphotos:

This week, Sports Illustrated pays tribute to Title IX and its impact on women’s sports over the past 40 years. 

GALLERY: The 40 greatest women athletes of Title IX era
KILLION: Title IX has changed the world we live in

#Soccer #USWNT #Football #Sports #Women's Sports #large

Prehistoric Timbers Army banner discovered. Found on tour in San Jose, August 25th 1975, in the North American Soccer League championship game between the Portland Timbers and the Tampa Bay Rowdies. The Rowdies won 2-0.
AP Photo

Prehistoric Timbers Army banner discovered. Found on tour in San Jose, August 25th 1975, in the North American Soccer League championship game between the Portland Timbers and the Tampa Bay Rowdies. The Rowdies won 2-0.

AP Photo

#Portland Timbers #Timbers Army #Tampa Bay Rowdies #NASL #Soccer #Football #1970s #San Jose #Sports #History #large

Florida State College women’s soccer team, 1927.
Source: Florida Memory

Florida State College women’s soccer team, 1927.

Source: Florida Memory

#Florida #Women's Soccer #Football #Soccer #1920s #History #Sports #large

The Original Vikings Football Team in Minnesota

Excellent archival photos and info on Minneapolis’ first soccer teams.

#Soccer #Football #Minneapolis #History #Minnesota #Sports #Minnesota Vikings

XI is now 48% funded on Kickstarter. If 100% of the target isn’t reached by two weeks tomorrow, nothing goes to XI to launch the magazine. Please share and support as you can here: http://kck.st/H51kHc

XI is now 48% funded on Kickstarter. If 100% of the target isn’t reached by two weeks tomorrow, nothing goes to XI to launch the magazine. Please share and support as you can here: http://kck.st/H51kHc

#Soccer #Football #Kickstarter #Community #DIY #Sports #Journalism #Magazine #Writing #large

May 30th 1960, Roosevelt Stadium, Jersey City, NJ. A little research shows this game was almost certainly between Scottish champions Kilmarnock and Irish club Glenovan, part of the ambitious International Soccer League (ISL). Kilmarnock won 2-0 in front of 5,916 spectators. The New York Times reported the next day that “The Scots showed more speed and more imagination. In addition, they seemed in better physical shape.” - not surprising, the newspaper added, given the Scots were professionals and the Irish semi-pros.
Roosevelt Stadium was one of two venues for the ISL in 1960, the league’s first season featuring 12 teams (one American, the rest from around the world, including Bayern Munich from West Germany and Burnley from England). The other games - mostly better attended - took place at the Polo Grounds in Manhattan (here’s a piece from Pitch Invasion on the launch of the ISL).
Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division
These are the stories XI wants to tell in greater depth in print, with your support.

May 30th 1960, Roosevelt Stadium, Jersey City, NJ. A little research shows this game was almost certainly between Scottish champions Kilmarnock and Irish club Glenovan, part of the ambitious International Soccer League (ISL). Kilmarnock won 2-0 in front of 5,916 spectators. The New York Times reported the next day that “The Scots showed more speed and more imagination. In addition, they seemed in better physical shape.” - not surprising, the newspaper added, given the Scots were professionals and the Irish semi-pros.

Roosevelt Stadium was one of two venues for the ISL in 1960, the league’s first season featuring 12 teams (one American, the rest from around the world, including Bayern Munich from West Germany and Burnley from England). The other games - mostly better attended - took place at the Polo Grounds in Manhattan (here’s a piece from Pitch Invasion on the launch of the ISL).

Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

These are the stories XI wants to tell in greater depth in print, with your support.

#New Jersey #Soccer #Football #History #Roosevelt Stadium #Sports #large

In March 1973, Soccer America published an opinion piece asking the simple question regarding soccer in America: “Where are we going?”
The answer was lengthy and thoughtful, reproduced above from a scan by XI co-editor David Keyes for his research. The piece tied the future of soccer to the suburban (or even exurban) -isation of America. It recognized the rapidly growing appeal of soccer as a participant sport - a 98% renewal rate for youth soccer players year-on-year - while noting that “the dark picture of youth soccer is that the centralized portions of great cities are not participating in an equivalent number to the outer portions of the city environment, the rural portions.”
This is put down largely to the lack of playing sites; “If the big cities are deteriorating due to youth crime and lack of community activities, such as soccer, then “Where are we going?”
The answer, for the author, lay in the future: in urban areas, vacant city lots would become soccer fields. This possibility, the author admitted, was rather speculative (“While this has yet to happen, the concept is not out of the realm of possibility”).
A more definite route for youth soccer’s success was seen by the author as families fled to the suburbs. “A spreading populous will cultivate more soccer fields…where are we going? Evidently where there is more open space with a lot of grass - and soccer is helping to take us there.”
Here we have the youth soccer explosion of the next three decades, the soccer mom generation, foretold in 1973.
These are the stories XI wants to tell in greater depth in print, with your support.

In March 1973, Soccer America published an opinion piece asking the simple question regarding soccer in America: “Where are we going?”

The answer was lengthy and thoughtful, reproduced above from a scan by XI co-editor David Keyes for his research. The piece tied the future of soccer to the suburban (or even exurban) -isation of America. It recognized the rapidly growing appeal of soccer as a participant sport - a 98% renewal rate for youth soccer players year-on-year - while noting that “the dark picture of youth soccer is that the centralized portions of great cities are not participating in an equivalent number to the outer portions of the city environment, the rural portions.”

This is put down largely to the lack of playing sites; “If the big cities are deteriorating due to youth crime and lack of community activities, such as soccer, then “Where are we going?”

The answer, for the author, lay in the future: in urban areas, vacant city lots would become soccer fields. This possibility, the author admitted, was rather speculative (“While this has yet to happen, the concept is not out of the realm of possibility”).

A more definite route for youth soccer’s success was seen by the author as families fled to the suburbs. “A spreading populous will cultivate more soccer fields…where are we going? Evidently where there is more open space with a lot of grass - and soccer is helping to take us there.”

Here we have the youth soccer explosion of the next three decades, the soccer mom generation, foretold in 1973.

These are the stories XI wants to tell in greater depth in print, with your support.

#Youth Soccer #Football #Soccer #Sports #Urban #Suburban #large

Peter J. Peel, wearing some cricket-style shin guards at a soccer field in Chicago, 1905. Peel was an important figure in Illinois and indeed American soccer history. An immigrant from Ireland, Peel founded the Illinois State Soccer Association (ISSA) and was later a president of the United States Football Association. He helped found a knockout cup in 1909, still running today (now the Illinois state cup), that preceded the foundation of the US Open Cup in 1914. The competition was known as the Peel Cup until 1971, when the trophy was lost (never yet recovered), replaced by the Governor’s Cup.
Source: Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago History Museum

Peter J. Peel, wearing some cricket-style shin guards at a soccer field in Chicago, 1905. Peel was an important figure in Illinois and indeed American soccer history. An immigrant from Ireland, Peel founded the Illinois State Soccer Association (ISSA) and was later a president of the United States Football Association. He helped found a knockout cup in 1909, still running today (now the Illinois state cup), that preceded the foundation of the US Open Cup in 1914. The competition was known as the Peel Cup until 1971, when the trophy was lost (never yet recovered), replaced by the Governor’s Cup.

Source: Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago History Museum

#Peter Peel #Illinois #Chicago #Chicago History #history #soccer #football #sports #large

Cover of Soccer America, April 3rd 1973. Reproduced with permission, scanned by XI co-editor David Keyes as part of his research into the ‘Americanization’ of soccer in the U.S.

Cover of Soccer America, April 3rd 1973. Reproduced with permission, scanned by XI co-editor David Keyes as part of his research into the ‘Americanization’ of soccer in the U.S.

#Soccer #Football #Youth Soccer #Magazine #Cover #Design #Graphic #Journalism #Sports

$4k reached on Kickstarter! Please pledge what you can to support the launch of a new North American soccer magazine, and more importantly, spread the word. Thank you!

$4k reached on Kickstarter! Please pledge what you can to support the launch of a new North American soccer magazine, and more importantly, spread the word. Thank you!

#Soccer #Football #Sports #American Soccer #Magazine #Journalism #Kickstarter

shawnlevy:

Some dude winning something at the site of the current Jeld-Wen Field. #rctid

shawnlevy:

Some dude winning something at the site of the current Jeld-Wen Field. #rctid

#Pele #Portland #Jeld-Wen Field #NASL #Soccer #Football #Sports #Legend

The first in a series of historical scans from Soccer America magazine. Founded in 1971, SA has been covering the news of the sport ever since, and XI co-editor David Keyes has been rooting through their archives. This first post looks at the state of the NASL heading into 1973, the New York Cosmos having won their first championship the season before.
Reproduced with the permission of Soccer America

The first in a series of historical scans from Soccer America magazine. Founded in 1971, SA has been covering the news of the sport ever since, and XI co-editor David Keyes has been rooting through their archives. This first post looks at the state of the NASL heading into 1973, the New York Cosmos having won their first championship the season before.

Reproduced with the permission of Soccer America

#Soccer America #Soccer #Football #Sports #History #Magazine #Archive #Journalism #NASL #large #New York Cosmos

Yesterday we wrote about the very very first North American Soccer League, oft-forgotten. Top scorer in the first season of the first NASL, 1946, was Gil Heron, a Jamaican-born immigrant to the United States whose prolific goalscoring earned him a trial at Glasgow Celtic. He won a professional contract and moved to Scotland - shortly after the birth of Gil Scott-Heron in Chicago - becoming Celtic’s first black player.
chuyelrojo:

Gil Heron.  Wearing the hoops of Celtic Football Club.

Yesterday we wrote about the very very first North American Soccer League, oft-forgotten. Top scorer in the first season of the first NASL, 1946, was Gil Heron, a Jamaican-born immigrant to the United States whose prolific goalscoring earned him a trial at Glasgow Celtic. He won a professional contract and moved to Scotland - shortly after the birth of Gil Scott-Heron in Chicago - becoming Celtic’s first black player.

chuyelrojo:

Gil Heron.  Wearing the hoops of Celtic Football Club.

#Gil Heron #Celtic #Soccer #Football #NASL #Sports #large